EMI Australia - Index Majestic Compilations

EMI Australia – 1960s & 1970s

EMI Compilations

Columbia, EMI, HMV

Notes.

Note: Co-releases now have their own section. Goto: Co-releases

 


Click or tap image for track listing and cover images.

Serial number

Title

Artist

Year

MX Number

Notes

The Stars With Their Hits Front Cover OCLP 7609
HMV
The Stars With Their Hits Various 1963
 
Hit Wave - front cover OELP 9338
HMV
Hit Wave Various 1968
Highest Position #16 – 17 Aug ’68
Another Hit Wave - front cover OEX 9420
Columbia
Another Hit Wave Various 1969?
 
Hit Wave Vol. 3 - front cover

OEX 9528
Columbia

Hit Wave Vol. 3

Various

1970?
 
20 Explosive Hits - front cover TVS-3
Columbia
Explosive Hits

Various

1970
6 weeks in Top 50
Highest Position #22 – 31 Aug ’70
EMI - Go-Set Pop Poll Awards 1970 - front cover SOEX-9666
Columbia
Go-Set Pop Poll Awards 1970 Various 1970
 
Go-Set Pop Poll Awards 1971 - front cover SOELP-9829
HMV
Go-Set Pop Poll Awards 1971 Various 1971
 
Telethon 71 - EMI - HMV - SL-103 SL103
HMV
Telethon 71 Various 1971
 
20 Explosive Hits 71 - front cover TVSS7
HMV
20 Explosive Hits 1971 Various 1971
4 weeks in Top 50
Highest Position #24 – 15 Nov ’71
A Hair of the Dog - front cover SOELP-10136
EMI
A Hair of the Dog Various 1972
 
Telethon 72 - EMI - HMV - SL-104 SL104
EMI
Telethon 72 Various 1972
 
Explosive Hits '73 - front cover TVSS10
HMV
Explosive Hits ’73 Various 1973

 

9 weeks in Top 50
Highest Position #44 – 7 May ’73
Telethon 73 - Sounds Fantastic - EMI - HMV - SL108 SL108
HMV
Telethon 73 Various 1973    
Explosive Hits 74 - front cover TVSS16
HMV
Explosive Hits ’74 Various 1974    
Telethon 74 - EMI - HMV - SL112 SL112
HMV
Telethon Various 1974    
TVSS17
HMV
Stardust Various 1974    
Telethon 75 - EMI - HMV - SL113 SL113
HMV
Telethon 75 Various 1975  
Screamer - front cover SCA-001
EMI
Screamer Various 1975 14 weeks in Top 100
Highest Position #30 – 24 Nov ’75
Explosive Hits '75 - front cover TVSS19
HMV
Explosive Hits ’75 Various 1975  
Bumper - front cover SCA-004
EMI (International)
Bumper Various 1976 13 weeks in Top 100
Highest Position #29 – 22 Mar ’76
Explosive Hits '76 - front cover SCA-008
EMI (International)
Explosive Hits ’76 Various 1976 17 weeks in Top 100
Highest Position #18 – 13 Sep ’76
SL117
HMV
Telethon 76 Various 1975  
Devastator - front cover SCA-013
EMI (International)
Devastator Various 1977   7 weeks in Top 100
Highest Position #32 – 14 Mar ’77
Explosive Hits 77 Front Cover EME-1005
EMI (International)
Explosive Hits ’77 Various 1977   12 weeks in Top 100
Highest Position #43 – 30 May ’77
Telethon 77 - EMI - SL119 SL119 Telethon 77 Various 1977  
Supa Hits - front cover SCA-022
EMI
Supa Hits Various 1978  
Explosive Radio Hits 78 - SCA028 - Front Cover SCA-028
EMI
Explosive Radio Hits 1978 Various 1978  
20 Golden Instrumentals - front cover SCA-035
EMI
20 Golden Instrumentals Various 1978  
Explosive Hits '78 - front cover EMTV.1
EMI
Explosive Hits 78 Various 1978  
Evolution of Rock Front Cover EME 1019
EMI
Evolution of Rock Various 1978  
Telethon 78 - EMI - SL120 SL120 Telethon 78 Various 1978  
Countdown Chartbusters Vol.1 Front Cover EMTV 2
EMI
Countdown Chartbusters Volume 1 Various 1979  
Drivetime Front Cover EMTV 3
EMI
Drivetime Various 1979  
Albert Archives Front Cover APLP 037
EMI – Albert
Albert Archives Various 1979  
EMI Rare Stuff Front Cover SHSM 2028
EMI – Harvest
The Rare Stuff? Various 1979  
Canned Rock Front Cover APLP 042
EMI – Albert
Canned Rock Various 1979  
Telethon 79 - EMI - SL122 SL122 Telethon 79 Various 1979  

EMI

Despite recent ownership changes, EMI remains a major player in Australia and is probably the longest surviving recording company. EMI has a long and complicated history, but EMI’s Australian division can be traced back to 1925 with the commencement of pressing operations by the The Gramophone Company in the Sydney suburb of Erskinville. A purpose built factory was established in 1927 at Homebush and the manufacture of EMI records remained there for some 60 years.

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Notes

Despite recent ownership changes, the EMI name remains a major player in Australia, and is probably the longest surviving recording company. EMI has a long and complicated history, but EMI’s Australian division can be traced back to 1925 with the commencement of pressing operations by the The Gramophone Company in the Sydney suburb of Erskinville. A purpose built factory was established in 1927 at Homebush and the manufacture of EMI records remained there for some 60 years.

Until 1958 EMI’s main Australian label was Regal-Zonophone, but with the end of 78 RPM disks the name was dropped in favour of the Columbia, HMV, and Parlophone names. There was a complicated numbering system in place for singles until 1968 when numbers were consolidated for a single unified system beginning at 8001. However, an even more complicated system was used for 12 inch releases. In 1972 EMI discontinued the Columbia, HMV, and Parlophone monikers for their singles and EPs, and everything was released under the EMI label, but HMV continued to be used for their so called TV specials. EMI was the only major Sydney company not involved with the Matrix number system which makes release orders even more complicated. There seems to be little logic to which label a compilation was released under – Hit Wave 1 is on HMV, while Another Hit Wave, and Hit Wave Volume 3 are on Columbia. However, from 1968 the HMV brand was used exclusively for classical music releases in other countries. Many of the early 1970s issues have the TVS (Television Special) numbering system. Fortunately, almost all the 1970s onwards releases have a publication year.

In the early 1980s the majors started to push out independents like K-Tel, and started to release their own compilations. These were often co-releases with CBS, EMI, Festival, and WEA rotating the publishing. This effectively spelt the end to labels such as Concept, J&B and K-Tel in the pop market as the majors kept the best releases for themselves or asked prohibitive licensing fees. This was also the era of the CD, and while it took another decade for LPs to be phased out completely, the end was nigh.

Currently (2013) EMI’s catalogue is owned by two companies. Universal own the mechanical rights – the right to physically make and sell the recordings, while Sony/ATV Music Publishing owns the publishing rights.

 

 

Please note: this is work in progress.

Available over art will be photographed as time permits.

Enjoy. 🙂